Community calendar | Calendar | somdnews.com – SoMdNews.com

Community calendar | Calendar | somdnews.com – SoMdNews.com

Send calendar events (at least two weeks in advance, if possible) to Community, 4475 Regency Place, Suite 301, White Plains, MD 20695. Email items to [email protected]. Include a contact phone number or email on all submissions.

Friday, April 19

Friday Fun Nights for children ages 5 to 17 are held at various community center locations. Each month is a different theme. For a list of dates, times and locations, go to www.charlescountyparks.com.

Friday Nighters Al-Anon Family Group meets at 8:30 p.m. Fridays at LifeStream Church of the Nazarene, at 5105 Leonardtown Road in Waldorf. No Alateen meeting. Go to www.marylanddc-alanon.org or call 1-800-425-2666.

American Legion Post 238 will hold a steak and/or fried shrimp dinner from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 6265 Brandywine Road in Hughesville. The cost is $15. For more information, call 301-274-3522 or visit the post on Facebook.

The Waldorf VFW Auxiliary will hold its 15th Annual Good Friday Fish Fry from 11 a.m. until sold out at the Waldorf Fire Department, at 3245 Old Washington Road in Waldorf. Each dinner includes three pieces of fish and a choice of two sides. Dinners are $12 each; sandwiches are also available for $7 each and bake sale items will also be available for purchase. Eat in or carry out. For more information, call 301-645-3000.

The Sons of the American Legion Squadron 82 will hold a Lenten fish fry from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Harry White Wilmer American Legion Post 82, at 6330 N. Crain Highway in La Plata. The menu includes two whiting fillets, green beans, cole slaw, hush puppies, fried potatoes, coffee and tea. The price is $12 each; gift certificates are available. For more information, call 301-934-8221.

The Waldorf Elks will hold a family dinner and Easter party from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at 2210 Washington Road in Waldorf. The seafood dinner includes fish, shrimp, crab balls, hush puppies and cole slaw. There will also be crafts and an egg hunt. Adult tickets are $25 each. One child eats free per adult ticket, otherwise child tickets are $5 each.

AMVETS Post 13 will hold a shrimp scampi dinner, with vegetable, salad, Italian bread and dessert, from 6 to 8 p.m. at 2310 Old Washington Road in Waldorf. Cost is $10.

Saturday, April 20

The Dr. Samuel Mudd House head docent Donna Peterson will present a collection of snippets, facts and quotes about and from 16th U.S. President Abraham Lincoln at 1 p.m. in the Exhibit Building at 3725 Dr. Samuel Mudd Road in Waldorf. The presentation is free, but space is limited.

American Legion Post 293 will hold a Texas hold-em tournament at 2310 Old Washington Road in Waldorf. Sign up is at 5:45 p.m. $100 buy-in. For more information, call 301-645-6331.

Smallwood State Park will host its annual Easter Egg Hunt at 2750 Sweden Point Road in Marbury rain or shine. Beginning at 10 a.m., there will be face painting, art projects, visits to the Discovery Center and more. For children ages three months to 10 years old. The egg hunt will begin at 10:30 a.m. starting with the youngest children. A donation of $3 per child is encouraged. For more information, call 301-743-7613.

Beyond the Classroom Inc. will host an Easter celebration from 2 to 5 p.m. at Restore Health, at 4615 Einstein Place in White Plains. The event will include crafts, an Easter egg hunt and refreshments. For all ages. Register online at https://eastercelebration042019.eventbrite.com.

Sunday, April 21

The Southern Maryland Audubon Society will hold an Earth Day Field Trip to the Port Tobacco River Park, at 7740 Chapel Point Road in Port Tobacco, from 8 to 10 a.m., to look for migrating birds, check out the eagle nest and to look for wildflowers. RSVP to Lynne Wheeler by texting to 301-751-8097 or email [email protected].

The Port Tobacco River Conservancy and the Southern Maryland Audubon Society will be removing invasive plants at Chapel Point State Park, at 8855 Chapel Point Road in Port Tobacco, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Gloves will be provided. For more information, text Lynne Wheeler at 301-751-8097 or email [email protected].

Monday, April 22

VConnections holds Veterans Coffee Breaks 9 to 10:30 a.m. Mondays at Chick-fil-A, located at 107 Drury Drive in La Plata. For more information, go to www.vconnections.org.

Tuesday, April 23

Pomfret Way-of-Life Al-Anon Family Group and Alateen meets 8 p.m. Tuesdays at St. Joseph Church, at 4950 St. Joseph Way in Pomfret. For more information, go to www.marylanddc-alanon.org or call 1-800-425-2666.

Crossroads Apostolic Church is hosting a free presentation, “Protecting Your Family in Public Places — Surving a Mass Shooting” from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at 10725 Willetts Crossing Rd. in White Plains. Charles County Sheriff’s Office Corporal Steven Bryant is the presenter. A meet and greet with light refreshments will take place 30 minutes prior to the presentation. To register, visit www.cacfamily.com.

American Legion Post 293 will hold a members meeting at 7 p.m. at 2310 Old Washington Road in Waldorf.

Wednesday, April 24

VConnections holds Veterans Coffee Breaks 9 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays at Chick-fil-A, at 3365 Crain Highway in Waldorf. For more information, go to www.vconnections.org.

Kiwanis of Waldorf meets Wednesdays 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Comfort Suites, at 11765 Business Park Drive in Waldorf. Contact Millie Kriemelmeyer at 301-372-8766 or [email protected].

The College of Southern Maryland will hold an open house from 5 to 7 p.m. at in the Fine Arts Center Theater, La Plata campus, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata. Register at www.csmd.edu/apply-register/credit/campus-open-house-tours/.

AMVETS Post 13 will hold a members meeting at 7 p.m. at 2310 Old Washington Road in Waldorf.

The Greater Accokeek Civic Association will hold its membership meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Accokeek Volunteer Fire Department, at 16111 Livingston Road in Accokeek.

Thursday, April 25

American Legion Auxiliary Unit 82 holds Bingo on Thursdays at Harry White Wilmer American Legion Post 82, at 6330 Crain Highway in La Plata. Early birds begin 7 p.m. Doors open 6 p.m. Call 301-934-8221.

VConnections assists senior and elderly veterans and families 2 to 4 p.m. every Thursday at Clark Senior Center, at 1210 Charles St. in La Plata. By appointment only. For information, go to www.vconnections.org.

The College of Southern Maryland Main Stage Theater presents the musical “Pippin,” at 7:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center Theater, La Plata campus, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, military and youth. For tickets, email [email protected], call 301-934-7828 or visit www.csmd.edu/community/the-arts/theatre-and-dance/.

American Legion Post 293 will hold a steak and cheese sandwich night, with a la carte menu, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at 2310 Old Washington Road in Waldorf.

Friday, April 26

Friday Fun Nights for children ages 5 to 17 are held at various community center locations. Each month is a different theme. For a list of dates, times and locations, go to www.charlescountyparks.com.

Friday Nighters Al-Anon Family Group meets at 8:30 p.m. Fridays at LifeStream Church of the Nazarene, at 5105 Leonardtown Road in Waldorf. No Alateen meeting. Go to www.marylanddc-alanon.org or call 1-800-425-2666.

American Legion Post 238 will hold a rotisserie chicken dinner from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 6265 Brandywine Road in Hughesville. The cost is $10. For more information, call 301-274-3522 or visit the post on Facebook.

The College of Southern Maryland Main Stage Theater presents the musical “Pippin,” at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center Theater, La Plata campus, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, military and youth. For tickets, email [email protected], call 301-934-7828 or visit www.csmd.edu/community/the-arts/theatre-and-dance/.

Bethel Baptist Church will host a free clothing swap from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 6705 Boots Lane in La Plata, off Ripley Road. For more information, call the church at 301-743-2363 or Dana Weaver at 301-743-7225, or visit www.bbcmd.org.

The VFW Auxiliary will hold a ham and scalloped potatoes dinner from 6 to 8 p.m. at 2310 Old Washington Road in Waldorf. Cost is $10.

Saturday, April 27

The College of Southern Maryland Main Stage Theater presents the musical “Pippin,” at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center Theater, La Plata campus, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, military and youth. For tickets, email [email protected], call 301-934-7828 or visit www.csmd.edu/community/the-arts/theatre-and-dance/.

Bethel Baptist Church will host a free clothing swap from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 6705 Boots Lane in La Plata, off Ripley Road. For more information, call the church at 301-743-2363 or Dana Weaver at 301-743-7225, or visit www.bbcmd.org.

The Bryans Road Shopping Center Community Outreach Center will host a Touch-A-Truck event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the shopping center parking lot, at 3095 Marshall Hall Road in Bryans Road. Touch and explore an unmarked police car, ATV, Incident Command Vehicle, D.A.R.E. vehicle, fire truck, ambulance, cement truck, oil tanker and more. Admission is $5 and one canned good. Children ages 12 and under are free. There will also be a scavenger hunt, prize raffles and a secret, surprise guest. For more information, call Gloria Jolly at 301-509-6637.

St. Mary’s Bryantown School will host its annual afternoon tea from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 13735 Notre Dame Place in Bryantown. The event includes tea, lunch, dessert, chocolate fountain, DIY photo station, cookie decorating, crafts, music, raffle items, door prizes and more. Tickets are $25 for adults, $15 for students, or $180 for a table of 10. For more information, email Sarah Crozier at [email protected].

VConnections and the Charleston Senior Community will host a Veterans Awareness Event from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at 45 St. Patrick’s Drive in Waldorf. Topics include entitlements, resources, senior benefits and more. RSVP by April 20 by emailing [email protected].

Sunday, April 28

American Legion Post 238 will be serving breakfast from 9 to 11 a.m. at 6265 Brandywine Road in Hughesville. The cost is $7, and the public is invited. For more information, call 301-274-3522 or visit the post on Facebook.

The Southern Maryland Center for Independent Living will hold its second annual designer bag Bingo beginning at noon at the St. Mary’s County Fairgrounds, at 42455 Fairgrounds Road in Leonardtown. Over $7,000 in prizes, featuring bags and accessories from name-brand designers, will be awarded. Tickets are $30 in advance. For more information or for tickets, call 301-884-4498, ext. 1, or visit www.smcil.org/events.

The Waldorf Lions Club is holding its annual Bull and Oyster Roast from noon to 4 p.m. at the Waldorf Elks Lodge, 2210 Old Washington Road in Waldorf. All proceeds go to funding humanitarian efforts here in Southern Maryland and around the world. Tickets are $45 each; children 12 and under are free. Each meal includes oysters, fried and on the half shell, roast beef, steamed shrimp, beer butt chicken, ribs, hot dogs and sides. Also included are soft drinks and draft beer. There will also be a cash bar, games of chance and more. Tickets are available online at www.waldorflions.com or from any Waldorf Lions member.

Tuesday, April 30

Pomfret Way-of-Life Al-Anon Family Group and Alateen meets 8 p.m. Tuesdays at St. Joseph Church, at 4950 St. Joseph Way in Pomfret. For more information, go to www.marylanddc-alanon.org or call 1-800-425-2666.

The Help you Have, an addiction awareness event, will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at The Dome at New Life, 9690 Shepherds Creek Place in La Plata. The event will feature information about addiction treatment options and support services for the families and children of addicts. Professionals and representatives from agencies such as Outreach Recovery, National Capital Area Teen Challenge and others will be in attendance.

Court Appointed Special Advocates of Southern Maryland is seeking volunteers to advocate for children removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect. Interested volunteers should visit http://center-for-children.org/programs/court-appointed-special-advocate-casa/ for more information, or reach out to CASA of Southern Maryland by emailing [email protected] or calling NaQuita Coates, training and recruitment specialist, at 410-535-3047.

Wednesday, May 1

The Southern Maryland Audubon Society will hold a talk, “Get Smart with APPropriate Birding,” from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the Charles County Soil Conservation District, at 4200 Gardiner Road in Waldorf. Learn about citizen science with birding and nature apps for phones and other devices. Light refreshments will be served. The public is invited to this free event. For more information, text Lynne Wheeler at 301-751-8097 or email [email protected].

VConnections holds Veterans Coffee Breaks 9 to 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays at Chick-fil-A, at 3365 Crain Highway in Waldorf. For more information, go to www.vconnections.org.{p class=”western”}Free Foreclosure Legal Clinic with Maryland Volunteer Lawyer, the first Wednesday of each month at Charles County Public Law Library (basement of the circuit court building), at 200 Charles St. in La Plata. One-on-one online sessions with an experienced attorney. For an appointment, call 301-932-3322.{p class=”western”}Kiwanis of Waldorf meets Wednesdays 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Comfort Suites, at 11765 Business Park Drive in Waldorf. Contact Millie Kriemelmeyer at 301-372-8766 or [email protected].{p class=”western”}American Legion Auxiliary Unit 293 will hold a members meeting at 7 p.m. at 2310 Old Washington Road in Waldorf.

The Saint Mary’s County Camera Club will meet at 7 p.m. at the University System of Maryland at Southern Maryland, formerly known as the Southern Maryland Higher Education Center, located at 44219 Airport Road in California. The meeting will feature a presentation by Bill Cassidy of the Smallwood Camera Club on creating interesting bokeh effects with cameras. Those interested in trying the techniques bring their camera with them. Visitors are welcome. For more information, email [email protected] or visit www.smccc.org.{p class=”western”}Thursday, May 2{p class=”western”}National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association, NARFE, Indian Head Chapter 126 meets at noon the first Thursday of each month at Mama Stella’s Pasta House Restaurant, at 7075 Indian Head Highway in Bryans Road. Contact Joan Wright, 301-246-4112 or [email protected].{p class=”western”}American Legion Auxiliary Unit 82 holds bingo on Thursdays at Harry White Wilmer American Legion Post 82, at 6330 Crain Highway in La Plata. Early birds begin 7 p.m. Doors open 6 p.m. Call 301-934-8221.{p class=”western”}VConnections assists senior and elderly veterans and families 2 to 4 p.m. every Thursday at Clark Senior Center, at 1210 Charles St. in La Plata. By appointment only. For information, go to www.vconnections.org.{p class=”western”}American Legion Post 293 will hold a steak and cheese night, with a la carte menu, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at 2310 Old Washington Road in Waldorf.{p class=”western”}The Reithoffer Shows Spring Carnival opens from 5 to 11 p.m. at the St. Charles Towne Center, at 11110 Mall Circle in Waldorf, in the lower portion of the parking lot across from AMC Theatres. The carnival runs weekdays from 5 to 11 p.m. and weekends from 1 to 11 p.m. until May 12.

Friday, May 3

The College of Southern Maryland Main Stage Theater presents the musical “Pippin,” at 7 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center Theater, La Plata campus, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, military and youth. For tickets, email [email protected], call 301-934-7828 or visit www.csmd.edu/community/the-arts/theatre-and-dance/.

Friday Fun Nights for children ages 5 to 17 are held at various community center locations. Each month is a different theme. For a list of dates, times and locations, go to www.charlescountyparks.com.{p class=”western”}Friday Nighters Al-Anon Family Group meets at 8:30 p.m. Fridays at LifeStream Church of the Nazarene, at 5105 Leonardtown Road in Waldorf. No Alateen meeting. Go to www.marylanddc-alanon.org or call 1-800-425-2666.{p class=”western”}American Legion Post 293 will hold a dinner, to be determined, from 6 to 8 p.m. at 2310 Old Washington Road in Waldorf. Cost is $10.

The College of Southern Maryland Women in STEM Conference will take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 3 on the La Plata campus, Center for Building and Industry building, room 113 at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata. This free one-day event features workshops, presentations and discussions designed to inform young women about STEM-related careers. Open to young women 13 and older as well as high school math teachers and parents. For more information, call 301-934-7808 or email [email protected]. Please RSVP and register at http://stem.csmd.edu/events_WAMinfo.html.

American Legion Post 238 will hold a seafood dinner from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 6265 Brandywine Road in Hughesville. Cost ranges from $7 to $15. For more information, call 301-274-3522 or visit the post on Facebook.

Saturday, May 4

The Master Gardener Annual Plant Sale will be hedl from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the La Plata Farmers Market, at the corner of Talbot Street and Washington Avenue in La Plata, and the Waldorf Farmers Market, at 10385 O’Donnell Place in Waldorf.

The College of Southern Maryland Main Stage Theater presents the musical “Pippin,” at 2 p.m. in the Fine Arts Center Theater, La Plata campus, at 8730 Mitchell Road in La Plata. Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for seniors, military and youth. For tickets, email [email protected], call 301-934-7828 or visit www.csmd.edu/community/the-arts/theatre-and-dance/.

The Society for the Restoration of Port Tobacco will celebrate its 10th Annual Market Day from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Historic Port Tobacco Courthouse, at 8430 Commerce St. in Port Tobacco. Numerous local vendors will be in attendance, there will be tours of the historic buildings and the Charles County Garden Club will hold its annual plant sale. Admission is free. Rain date is May 18. For more information, call Mary Fenton at 301-375-7892.

The VFW Post 8810 Annual Putt-Putt Tournament Fundraiser will be held at Fun Haven Golf, at 5075 Crain Highway in La Plata. Check in is at 8:30 a.m.

The St. Charles Towne Center will host jazz trio “Higher Standards” from noon to 4 p.m. at 11110 Mall Circle in Waldorf.

The Crossroads of Hughesville Garden Club will hold a free educational workshop, “How to Create a Fairy Garden,” in conjunction with its annual plant and yard sale, from 11 to 11:30 a.m. at 17388 Teagues Point Road in Hughesville.

The Crossroads of Hughesville Garden Club will hold a free educational workshop, “How to Create a Simple Bird Feeder,” in conjunction with its annual plant and yard sale, from noon to 12:30 p.m. at 17388 Teagues Point Road in Hughesville.

New Hope Church in Waldorf will hold an “Honoring Our Heroes” picnic for all active duty or retired military and veterans from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the New Hope gymnasium at 4200 Old Washington Road in Waldorf. Must register by April 21. For more information, call 301-843-3887 or sign up in the church foyer.

Hard Bargain Farm will host an introductory workshop on fermented foods from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Cafritz Environmental Center, at 2201 Bryan Point Road in Accokeek. Learn about fermented foods such as kombucha, kimchi, kefir and kvass and learn how to make your own jar of fermented vegetables. Tickets are $10 each and are available at https://fermentationworkshopathbf.eventbrite.com. For more information call 301-292-5665.

https://www.somdnews.com/independent/community/calendar/community-calendar/article_f27e5d42-ba15-5b09-bec4-097200c7ecef.html

Culture at the Cinema: ‘Richard II’ is dark work from Bard – Cayman Compass

Culture at the Cinema: ‘Richard II’ is dark work from Bard – Cayman Compass

When a play is called ‘The Tragedy of King Richard the Second’, chances are good that there are limited laughs to be had.

Culture at the Cinema brings the live version of the stage production to the big screen at Camana Bay on Saturday. Starring Simon Russell Beale in the lead role, the play won rave reviews from critics; just prepare for a very bleak story.

The visceral new production about the limits of power is directed by Joe Hill-Gibbins, whose previous plays include ‘Little Revolution’ at the Almeida and ‘Absolute Hell’ at the National Theatre.

Plot

A story of power and plotting, ‘Richard II’ is the first of Shakespeare’s four plays about the House of Lancaster.

In the presence of King Richard, Henry Bolingbroke (who would eventually be Henry IV) accuses Thomas Mowbray (Duke of Norfolk) of embezzling crown funds and of plotting the death of his uncle, the Duke of Gloucester. They will not be reconciled and are about to fight, but Richard stops the combat before it can begin.

Bolingbroke is exiled for 10 years (later reduced to six); Mowbray is exiled for life.

John of Gaunt (Duke of Lancaster, uncle to the king and Bolingbroke’s father) dies after accusing Richard of improper government. Richard orders the seizure of Gaunt’s property, denying Bolingbroke his inheritance. He then departs for Ireland, appointing his other uncle York to govern in his absence.

The Duke of Northumberland reveals that Bolingbroke has returned to England with an army. Bolingbroke persuades his uncle York that he has returned for his rightful inheritance, not to start a rebellion against the crown. Richard returns from Ireland to discover that his Welsh troops have deserted him, that York has allied himself with Bolingbroke, and the common people are rising against him.

Bolingbroke and his supporters meet with Richard. Bolingbroke promises to surrender his arms if his banishment is repealed and his inheritance restored. Richard agrees to his demands. Richard’s cousin, the Duke of Aumerle, is accused of murdering the Duke of Gloucester. Bolingbroke arrests everyone involved in the allegations. Richard agrees to abdicate. Bolingbroke announces his coronation.

A plot is hatched to restore Richard to the throne. York discovers that his son Aumerle is involved in a plot to kill Bolingbroke. Aumerle confesses to Bolingbroke, and is pardoned. Richard is killed whilst imprisoned in Pomfret Castle. Bolingbroke receives news of his supporters’ efforts to defeat his detractors. Exton presents Richard’s body to Bolingbroke, only to be rewarded with banishment. Bolingbroke promises to undertake a pilgrimage to expiate his sins.

Culture at the Cinema’s showing of ‘The Tragedy of King Richard the Second’ is on Saturday at Camana Bay Cinema. Doors open at 7 p.m. and show starts at 8 p.m. Only 18 and older will be admitted. Tickets are $40 per person and include a glass of bubbly.

Licensed bar on premises. For more information on upcoming screenings, visit www.bigscreen.ky.

https://www.caymancompass.com/2019/04/18/culture-at-the-cinema-richard-ii-is-dark-work-from-bard/

Scientists Actively Working Towards Zombie Apocalypse By Restoring Brain Function in Dead Pigs – IGN

Scientists Actively Working Towards Zombie Apocalypse By Restoring Brain Function in Dead Pigs – IGN

Scientists Actively Working Towards Zombie Apocalypse By Restoring Brain Function in Dead Pigs  IGN

Zombie Apocalypse? Scientific breakthrough? This will be the ultimate question as scientists have restored some brain function in dead pigs.

https://www.ign.com/articles/2019/04/18/scientists-actively-working-towards-zombie-apocalypse-by-restoring-brain-function-in-dead-pigs

Citizens of Mockingbird: Dakin Matthews on the Good Old Boy Who Rules Over the Courtroom with Wisdom and Wit – Broadway.com

Citizens of Mockingbird: Dakin Matthews on the Good Old Boy Who Rules Over the Courtroom with Wisdom and Wit – Broadway.com

In adapting Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird for the stage, award-winning scribe Aaron Sorkin looked at the iconic characters of the recently named “best-loved” American novel with fresh eyes. In this exclusive series, Broadway.com talks with Sorkin and the talented performers who bring the citizens of Mayomb, Alabama to life every night at the Shubert Theatre.


DAKIN MATTHEWS AS JUDGE TAYLOR
WATCH VIDEO:

CHARACTER: Judge Taylor, the small-town judge presiding over the trial of Tom Robinson, who is being represented by his friend Atticus Fitch.

ACTOR: Dakin Matthew is an actor, playwright, director and theater scholar with over 50 years of film, TV and stage credits. On Broadway, he’s been a dramaturg on productions of Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Julius Caesar and Macbeth and a performer in nine shows, including recent turns in the plays The Iceman Cometh and The Audience and the musicals Rocky and Waitress.

DAKIN MATTHEWS ON PLAYING JUDGE TAYLOR: “I love the fact that we’re doing a great American classic. I was a teacher before I was an actor. My kids have all been teachers at one time or another and I like the idea that plays help people learn things and remember things. I’ve done lots of plays that are just pure entertainment and I’ve enjoyed them immensely, but when a play has significance in culture, that I enjoy a lot more.”

AARON SORKIN ON DAKIN MATTHEWS: “I’ve loved Dakin Matthews in so many of his performances. Every time he comes on stage or on screen, I get happy. It’s no different in To Kill a Mockingbird.”

Photographed at the Shubert Theatre by Caitlin McNaney for Broadway.com

https://www.broadway.com/buzz/195503/citizens-of-mockingbird-dakin-matthews-on-the-good-old-boy-who-rules-over-the-courtroom-with-wisdom-and-wit/

The Geoffrey Rush trial shows defamation can make victims become victims all over again – The Guardian

Geoffrey Rush greeted his vindication with a look of anguish. His demeanor outside the Federal Court last week was decidedly grim. So too, his wife Jane Menelaus.

If an $850,000 award of damages, with the promise of lots more to come, isn’t going to put a spring in your step, what sort of vindication is this?

Rush said: “There are no winners in this case, it has been extremely distressing for everyone involved.”

The main defence witness Eryn Jean Norvill agreed: “There are no winners, only losers.”

Justice Michael Wigney had the same sentiment: “This is a sad and unfortunate case.”

Of course, there are winners. The lawyers are the winners and on the Rush team that’s where you find the triumph – so much so that the applicant’s barrister Bruce McClintock started to give the media a little lecture about its responsibility.

This from a barrister who had a steady trade defending Channel Nine’s stories and acting for Eddie Obeid.

The aim of the verdict with its substantial dollar amounts is to vindicate the damaged party, salve his hurt feelings and restore his reputation. Yet it does none of those things satisfactorily.

Google has made the damage global. The story, in some form or other, is always there, just as is Norvill’s statement outside the court where she said:

“I stand by everything I said at trial. I told the truth. I know what happened. I was there.”

The future for Rush and Norvill is uncertain. It is to be hoped they can work again but it would be understandable if there was a lot of unhappiness and doubt to overcome before that is possible.

The subject of an attack such as this in a raffish fish-wrapper of a newspaper doesn’t have many options in how best to respond. Suing in defamation invariably is the primal instinct, particularly for a well-lined and prominent person such as Rush.

It only takes a few months before it becomes apparent that they have entered a nightmare world of pleadings, interrogatories, lawyers, cross-claims, hearings, interlocutory judgments, delays, appeals – all with the meter ticking.

Defamation is a blunt instrument and a far from ideal way to square the ledger. Justice Wigney agrees:

“It plainly would have been better for all concerned if the issues that arose in the saga that played out in this courtroom in October and November last year had been allowed to be dealt with in a different way and in a different place to the harsh adversarial world of a defamation proceeding.”

Frequently, lawyers acting for applicants win defamation cases by wholesale attacks on the media source. In the context of the #MeToo environment, invariably that means women are marched into the witness box to have their lives meticulously julienned.

We saw it in the Chris Gayle case against Fairfax and again in Rush, where the court heard evidence – that was ultimately rejected – that among other things, Rush had made groping gestures during rehearsal while Norvill was lying “dead” on the floor; make jokes about her with sexual innuendoes; licked his lips while looking at her; used his hands in groping gestures; touched her breast in the final scene of King Lear; moved his hand under her shirt and brushed her skin across her lower back; and sent the infamous text message “thinking of you more than is socially appropriate” accompanied by an emoji with a protruding tongue.

All of this was denied by Rush and by his theatre witnesses, director Neil Armfield and actors Robyn Nevin and Helen Buday. Mark Winter was the only witness who supported aspects of Norvill’s evidence.

In every instance, the judge preferred the applicant’s evidence. Armfield didn’t see any of the inappropriate behaviour, nor did Buday; some of the allegations were not put to Winter; things Norvill said in evidence were not in her original prepared statement; and she sent Rush friendly greetings and text messages even after he had allegedly behaved “inappropriately” towards her.

The judgment does not adequately explore why this may have been so. There was no explicit judicial recognition of the close friendship between Rush’s main theatre witnesses, an aspect that should have been considered and carefully weighed.

It is also entirely possible that new things are remembered by a witness after a formal statement has been prepared, and that even though Norvill had an unhappy time during the King Lear production she still wanted to keep a good relationship with a significant star like Rush. None of that was sufficiently explored in the judgment.

The judge also dismissed Norvill’s belief that people in the Sydney Theatre Company’s production of King Lear production were “complicit” in turning a blind eye to Rush’s behaviour. He equated this claim to saying that Nevin, Armfield and Buday were all lying and he rejected out of hand the possibility that “generational difference” played a part in the general acceptance of Rush’s alleged antics.

Wigney gave Rush’s colleagues a gold-plated endorsement: “… each of them was a highly-qualified, experienced, accomplished and well-respected, if not revered, figure in theatre circles. No question was raised about their character or integrity. Nor could it have been.”

Norvill gave evidence that on the day the 1 December article in the Telegraph appeared she had a conversation with Nevin in which she said Rush had harassed her. She told the court that Nevin’s response was, “I didn’t think Geoffrey was doing that anymore”.

Wigney did not accept that Norvill had taken her concerns to Nevin.

He rejected the accusation that Rush consciously stroked her right breast: “How could Mr Rush maintain the focus and state of mind which he considered necessary to properly perform this difficult scene, and yet engage in such a base and crude action as intentionally stroking Ms Norvill’s breast?”

As for the “socially inappropriate thoughts” with the panting emoji this too went nowhere. While many might regard this as suggestive of an older man salivating at the thought of a younger woman, Justice Wigney arrived at an entirely different conclusion – it was a throwaway line, a joke and it simply meant the actor was sorry for missing the opening night of a play in which Norvill was performing.

It was not believable that Rush was “putting it out there”.

The newspaper’s truth defence was out the window. This was more about the reluctant Norvill than it was about the Telegraph’s folly. The respondents put it that there was no motive for Ms Norvill to come to court and lie. Why would she make up a whole pile of unpleasant allegations just for the privilege of being torn apart in the witness box for a few days, and thereby putting her career on the line?

There’s another yawning vacant space that hovers over Wigney’s reasons. Seven days into the trial Nationwide News applied to amend its truth defence, saying it had a new witness.

Rush’s lawyers succeeded in getting a suppression order over the publication of the identity of that witness as well as the contents of the new information.

Apparently, the newspaper knew about this person for some time but had been unsuccessful in persuading her to give evidence. It was not until 26 October last year that a solicitor for the mystery person got in touch with Nationwide News’ lawyers and said she is now willing to give evidence.

Accompanying the application was a statement from the potential witness referring to a number of incidents during a time “Witness X” worked alongside Rush.

In his reasons for rejecting the application to bring forward this new evidence, Wigney said: “The incidents could broadly be said to be sexual in nature.”

More importantly, he said that if this new evidence was accepted it would be “capable of supporting the substantial truth of the general imputations that Mr Rush had engaged in scandalously inappropriate behaviour in the theatre, and had engaged in inappropriate behaviour of a sexual nature in the theatre”.

At that point he was uncertain whether the evidence would also support the imputation that Rush was a “pervert”, but possibly it could.

Even if all this was not sufficient to win the case for the newspaper publisher it would bear on the mitigation of damages, “perhaps significantly”.

Unfortunately, the witness was not available to attend the trial until the end of February, although she could have appeared by video link. In the end, Wigney refused to admit this evidence and the suppression order is still in place. To do so, he thought, would delay the trial and prejudice Rush. He had another trial starting in March, which meant the Rush proceedings could not resume until April. He wanted it to proceed forthwith.

As it happened, the dates for the March trial were subsequently vacated, so he could have heard from Witness X that month without unduly delaying his reasons beyond the date they were handed down on April 11.

When his verdict came down Nine Newspapers applied to have the suppression order lifted, but Justice Wigney said he would not consider that until 10 May.

So here we are. Defamation contests invite a contorted and artificial landscape where alleged victims can become victims all over again, where lives are irrevocably damaged and where frequently the truth goes missing in action. At least the lawyers are happy.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/apr/18/the-geoffrey-rush-trial-shows-defamation-can-make-victims-become-victims-all-over-again

Fairbury theatre up and running after fundraising campaign – Beatrice Daily Sun

Fairbury theatre up and running after fundraising campaign – Beatrice Daily Sun

After a five year hiatus, the Bonham Theatre in Fairbury is once again showing films on the big screen.

The theatre, which first opened on Sept. 27, 1926, earned its title as the showcase of the area, being a state-of-the-art facility when constructed.

But time took its toll, and the building fell into disrepair over the years. It eventually closed in 2012 after the then-owner was unable to afford a required upgrade to digital projects.

Then a group of Fairbury residents determined to keep the Bonham sprang into action and launched a fundraiser.

“We had so many different fundraisers, work days, demolition and cleaning, and all that was done by volunteers,” said Brooke Schwab, president of the Bonham Theatre Project. “Once we got to skilled labor we had contractors hired who came in and did a lot of the work, but we had a lot of volunteer work done also.

“The largest chunks of the money came from grants. Deb Ebke was our treasurer at the time and she did an amazing job of writing grants that we got.”

The Bonham Theatre Project is a nonprofit group organized to restore the theater. It bought the building at auction in 2013 for less than $25,000 with aspirations of restoring it to its former glory. Doing so required around $800,000 in renovations.

Upgrading to digital projectors was a key part of that, though fire code and safety upgrades were the biggest portion of the project.

“Upgrading the projector to digital was why it closed,” Schwab said. “Unfortunately for us, that wasn’t the only issue with the building. Once he shut down, for us to reopen all those fire codes and handicap accessibility and all that wasn’t compliant. It was grandfathered in before, and we had to meet them.

“The sprinkler system was one of those big ticket items that you hope to never use. At first it was a major challenge, but I think we’ve successfully met all the requirements and still did it in an aesthetically pleasing way.”

Some of the needed upgrades included modifying emergency exits, additional HVAC safety measures and a handicap accessible exit from the main theatre. A second theatre used to be upstairs, but is longer in use.

Organizers hope to one way raise funds to reopen the second theatre.

Great care was also taken to restore the dome ceiling in the theatre, which was previously blocked from view by a suspended ceiling.

“My generation growing up, I never saw the dome,” Schwab said. “But back when the balcony was opened up people saw that. During the demolition you couldn’t see this until you had a flashlight, but the stenciling was so faded you couldn’t even see it. We had an artist come in and do a replica of the stenciling.”

Schwab added the theatre is something the community takes pride in, and will show films and host events for years to come.

https://beatricedailysun.com/news/local/fairbury-theatre-up-and-running-after-fundraising-campaign/article_6192cc94-6d92-5513-9fff-b5a301c8d60a.html

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