Vietnamese film industry begins to diversify, and thrive – Viet Nam News

Vietnamese film industry begins to diversify, and thrive – Viet Nam News

 

Lê Hồng Lâm. 

What do you think about the Vietnamese film industry? Is our current film industry, compared to the past (before 1975), improving in terms of quality and depth?

From the perspective of a journalist with nearly 20 years following and writing about Việt Nam’s cinema, I often use the word “transitional” to talk about the Vietnamese film industry. It’s a film industry that was born decades later than the rest of the world and matured quite slowly. In each stage of development, there is no inheritance of the previous generation and there’s a lack of diversity. The film industry in the north is completely different from that in the south. And if we compare the current film industry with that of the 1990s, we see no connection or relevance.

However, there are a few directors and actors in each period that are remarkable.

Since the 1990s, film directors returning from overseas, or Vietnamese diaspora, such as Trần Anh Hùng, Tony Bùi and Nguyễn VõNghiêm Minh, brought back with them different eyes compared with those working and living here. Over the past ten years, some directors have made records such as Charlie Nguyễn, Victor Vũ, Phan Gia Nhật Linh, Ngô Thanh Vân, and some rare directors who pursue indie and arthouse films such as Phan Đăng Di, BùiThạcChuyên and Nguyễn Hoàng Điệp.

The period with the most achievements for the film industry, in my opinion, is the period from 1975 to the early 1990s, when State cinema partly escaped from its propaganda function, and shifted to describing the real lives of voiceless people. During this period, the film industry to some extent portrayed a true Vietnamese spirit and soul, in both good and bad ways. This is also the period in which the Vietnamese film industry made the best films, in my opinion.

In order for Việt Nam to be able to join developed film industries in the region, what do you think can be done at the management level as well as by the filmmakers themselves?

Việt Nam is still less developed than many other countries with regards to film production, both in terms of talents, technical skills or investment. We do not yet have a generation of talented directors who can build their own identity, but we do have some names that are recognised at prestigiousinternational film festivals, such as Đặng Nhật Minh with When the Tenth Month Comes, which was picked as one of the best Asian films of all time by CNN, Trần Anh Hùng with The Scent of Green Papaya and Cyclo, Tony Bùi with Three seasons, NguyễnVõNghiêm Minh with The Buffalo Boy and Phan Đăng Di with Bi, Don’t Be Afraid.

In my opinion, we do not yet have a generation of talented directors who can build their own identity or a clear voice of the country, but we have outstanding individuals more or less known to the world.

I think the Government is now mainly giving the film industry to the private sector and doesn’t have many supporting policies for young talent, nor any policies to preserve the heritage and the values of the past.  That leads to rather unhealthy development for the film industry – in the past, we had too many “propaganda” films, now we have too many entertaining films that lack depth, poignancy, or those  about social problems or marginalised people. As a matter of fact, we don’t have many films that touch the audience’s hearts and make them think, or make them feel related.

Without the government’s supportive policies, some directors have to stop their careers at age 50 and 60 – which is the golden age for many filmmakers.

For some of the new generation directors who are not dependent on the state’s budget or major private entertainment studios, they have to walk by themselves and choose a totally different path to find investment from international film investors or funds. And they have succeeded, to some extent. These independent filmmakers may face more challenges and difficulties, but I believe they will create a Vietnamese film identity in the near future.

 

Lê Hồng Lâm interviews artist Kiều Chinh, one of the most prominent artists of Saigon cinema prior to 1975, who had a successful career in the US since 1975 to date. Photo Vũ Khánh Tùng

How can Vietnamese film directors keep their national values while having to face fierce competition of Hollywood movies as well as from other Asian countries? Do you think the new generation of local directors will be able to quickly bring Vietnamese films to bigger markets?

In recent years, when the domestic film market flourished, the local film industry has some of the films that made it as the highest-grossing films of the year such as Hai Phượng (Furie), Cualạivợbầu (Love Again), Em chưa 18 (Jailbait), Em là bà nội của anh (Miss Granny). This shows that Vietnamese audiences still love Vietnamese films. However, there are still a series of films that failed.

According to my survey last year, the number of films that are box-office flops accounted for three-quarters of the number of films produced in the year. This year’s rate is similar. This shows that Viet Nam’s film industry is still underdeveloped and investment in the industry is still a gamble.

But I always believe in young directors and am waiting for a generation of filmmakers who have success at the box office but still don’t compromise and always carry their personal imprints. Only by doing so can they withstand the fierce competition from Hollywood films or other developed film industries in Asia.

But if a filmmaker does not follow the general public’s taste, will he or she lose the game?

To make a blockbuster, producers and directors have to appeal to the tastes of the mass audience. But that doesn’t mean a filmmaker has to lower his criteria to please a part of the audience that only goes to the theatre to be entertained. 

On the contrary, filmmakers should aim for elite audiences, true “movie-goers”, to conquer them with films that make them feel both entertained and touched. Artistic and experimental movies still need to be made, and directors must still try to make an impression. This makes the ecosystem of the cinema more diverse and interesting.

Indie films in recent times like Song Lang,  Nhắmmắtthấymùahè (Summer in Your Eyes), Thưamẹ con đi (Goodbye Mother), may not be successful at the box office, but I think these are good signs for the country’s independent cinema.

The directors of these films have dared to take the adventurous path by telling challenging stories. They might not be welcomed by the general public, but they created a strong belief for true movie-goers that they can have faith in the Vietnamese film industry again.

Besides entertaining films, the Vietnamese film industry really needs to have decent independent films to stay in the minds of viewers. As someone who is deeply entrenched in Vietnamese film, when I look at the signs, I feel quite optimistic. As the market grows, so do the tastes of the audiences in Việt Nam. 

You are conducting a research project on Saigon cinema before 1975. Can you share a little about this project?

Saigon Cinema 1954-1975 is my next independent project after the “101 Best Vietnamese Movies” book that I published last year. This is a research project to restore the heritage of cinema once in danger of being permanently lost. This is a challenging project because the resources are scarce and there are not many witnesses.

Fortunately, my project was funded by the British Council’s FAMLAB in Việt Nam and I am funded to go to the United States to meet some of the surviving witnesses of Southern cinema at this stage.

Meeting them has helped me with many valuable sources and extremely valuable emotions to revive the atmosphere of this period of the country’s film industry. In my opinion, this is a very special period of Vietnamese cinema that few people know about, especially the young generation.

I hope that through the project, which is expected to be published in a book in early 2020, the young generation of movie lovers will learn more about the golden age of southern cinema. After that, I may start my third project on famous film artists of the time, like a gift to those who contributed to the history of Vietnamese cinema in a period that has already past but will still ring like a bell if we know how to retrieve it.—VNS

 

http://vietnamnews.vn/sunday/inner-sanctum/534801/vietnamese-film-industry-begins-to-diversify-and-thrive.html

San Francisco’s Newly Renovated Presidio Theatre Holds Celebratory Opening Weekend • DanceLand – DanceLand

Presidio Theatre Renovation (Photo by Terry Lorant Photography)

(San Francisco, CA) – The newly transformed 1939 Presidio Theatre, located on the Main Post of San Francisco’s historic Presidio, will open its doors to the public Saturday and Sunday, September 21 and 22 for the first time in 24 years after a $30 million renovation. The Theatre will officially open with a ticketed party on Saturday evening, September 21, followed by a free public open house with family-themed entertainment and theatre tours Sunday afternoon, September 22.

The completely renovated and expanded Presidio Theatre features a 600-seat proscenium theatre, a pavilion and courtyard for events, large rehearsal space and other amenities. The Theatre is the result of a gift from the Margaret E. Haas Fund to restore and expand the facility and return it to the public for a wide variety of uses including live music, theater, dance, film, lectures and events.

Details about the opening weekend may be found below and at presidiotheatre.org

Presidio Theatre Renovation (Photo by Terry Lorant Photography)

PRESIDIO THEATRE OPENING WEEKEND

Opening Celebration
Saturday, September 21, 2019
6:30 – 10:00 pm
Tickets: $50

An evening of performances, history and festivities. Reception tours and performances by Beach Blanket Babylon, Leung’s White Crane Lion and Dragon Dancers, San Francisco Girls Chorus, Te Mano O Te Ra Tahitian dance and music.

Presidio Theatre Open House
Sunday, September 22, 2019
12:00 – 5:00 pm
Free admission

For the first time in 24 years, the newly transformed Presidio Theatre will open its doors to the public to explore the beautifully renovated theatre – a home for dance, theatre, music, cinema and performing arts of all kinds.

Presidio Theatre Renovation (Photo by Terry Lorant Photography)

The Open House features free behind-the-scenes experiences, docent tours, and a live performance by the Presidio Theatre Pop-Up Orchestra conducted by Laurie Cohen playing music of the 1930s, the original era of the Theatre.

All ages welcome, information and registration at presidiotheatre.org

Following the opening weekend, the Theatre will be host to performances including flamenco, contemporary dance, magic, improv theatre, film, children’s theater and highlights include collaborations with the San Francisco Ethnic Dance Festival, San Francisco Mime Troupe, ODC/Dance, American Indian Film Festival Awards, LIKHA-Pilipino Folk Ensemble, Ensambles Ballet Folklórico de San Francisco, San Francisco Silent Film Festival and Presidio Trust, Gamelan Sekar Jaya, John Santos, Perla Batalla, Sintonía, The Family Crest, Andrew Evans and Bay Area Theater Sports & Impro.

About the Newly Transformed Presidio Theatre

The completely renovated and expanded Presidio Theatre opens its doors to the public September 21 and features a 600-seat proscenium theatre, a pavilion and courtyard for events, large rehearsal space and other amenities. The Theatre is the result of a gift from the Margaret E. Haas Fund to restore and expand the facility and return it to the public for a wide variety of uses including live music, theater, dance, film, lectures and events.

Built by the Works Progress Administration (WPA) and first opened in 1939, the Presidio Theatre was a hub of social life on the military base for nearly 60 years when it screened movies for service members and their families. It also hosted live performances by some of the biggest names in show business, including Bob Hope and Jack Benny. The Theatre is part of the Presidio’s National Historic Landmark District and is an intact example of Spanish Colonial Revival-style architecture in the Presidio.​ It has been vacant since 1995.

Press Release Via: The Presidio Theatre

Related Coverage:
San Francisco’s Presidio Theatre Restoration Will Delight Performers and Audience Members

https://dance.land/san-francisco-presidio-theatre-reopens/

KEN CHISHOLM: Busy, diverse autumn theatre season begins – Cape Breton Post

KEN CHISHOLM: Busy, diverse autumn theatre season begins – Cape Breton Post

THE CENTRE ISLE 

With Labour Day here, the summer season in local theatre rings down the curtain and live theatre lovers can look forward to a full autumn of diverse, provocative and often tune-filled shows. 

First up from Sydney’s Highland Arts Theatre is “Silence: Mabel and Alexander Graham Bell”, running from Tuesday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m. nightly, at the Bentinck Street venue. 

“Silence: Mabel and Alexander Graham Bell” by Trina Davies opens up the autumn theatre season with a production at the Highland Arts Theatre in Sydney running from Tuesday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m. nightly.
“Silence: Mabel and Alexander Graham Bell” by Trina Davies opens up the autumn theatre season with a production at the Highland Arts Theatre in Sydney running from Tuesday, Sept. 17, to Sunday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m. nightly.

The love story between Bell and his wife, Mabel, is one for the ages. Mabel, deaf from a childhood illness, was taught to read lips and speak by Bell when he was hired by her wealthy family as a teacher. They were devoted to each other, rarely apart, and often collaborated on his many inventive projects. Mabel was specifically instrumental in forming the association of young aviators that eventually, with Bell’s guidance, resulted in the flight of the Silver Dart on the frozen Baddeck Bay. 

“Silence”, written by Trina Davies in 2018, premiered at The Grand Theatre in London, Ont., and also was staged at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. 

This production is directed by Ron Jenkins (“Extinction Song”, “Next to Normal”) and features a real-life couple, Kathleen O’Toole and Ciarán MacGillivray, as Mabel and Alexander. The cast also includes Todd Hiscock, Lindsay Thompson, and Alison Crosby. 

The sly wit of author Roald Dahl enchants families once more in the Savoy Theatre’s musical production of “Matilda” scheduled for Friday, Oct. 4, Saturday, Oct. 5, and Sunday, Oct. 6.
The sly wit of author Roald Dahl enchants families once more in the Savoy Theatre’s musical production of “Matilda” scheduled for Friday, Oct. 4, Saturday, Oct. 5, and Sunday, Oct. 6.

The Savoy Theatre in Glace Bay brings a family classic to its prestigious stage with “Matilda: The Musical” scheduled for Friday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 5, at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m., and Sunday Oct. 6, 1 p.m. 

With direction by Wesley J. Colford and musical direction by Barb Stetter, the Savoy stage will burst at its seams with fun songs and spirited dance with its tale about a little girl with brains, bravery, and psychokinetic powers who changes the lives of everyone she meets for the better. 

This show was first produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company with book by Dennis Kelly and original songs by Tim Minchin. “Matilda” has won 47 international awards and continues to thrill sold-out audiences of all ages around the world. 

Later in October, just in time for Halloween, the HAT offers the outrageous horror musical, “Little Shop of Horrors”, based on the iconic Roger Corman quickie (featuring a young Jack Nicholson) featuring a blood-thirsty plant, with book and lyrics by Howard Ashman and music by Alan Menkin (who later provided the song score for Disney’s “The Little Mermaid”). 

The HAT production is directed by Ron Jenkins, musically directed by Barbara Stetter, with choreography by Cynthia Vokey. It plays at the Hat from Tuesday, Oct. 29, to Sunday, Nov. 3, at 8 p.m. nightly. 

In November come two productions at the HAT and the Cape Breton University Boardmore Theatre, with both shows onstage from Tuesday, Nov. 19, to Sunday, Nov. 24. 

Bela Lugosi as “Dracula” remains the gold standard in the depiction of Bram Stoker’s vampire. The CBU Boardmore Theatre offers their interpretation with their production running running from Tuesday, Nov. 19, to Sunday, Nov. 24.
Bela Lugosi as “Dracula” remains the gold standard in the depiction of Bram Stoker’s vampire. The CBU Boardmore Theatre offers their interpretation with their production running running from Tuesday, Nov. 19, to Sunday, Nov. 24.

“Dracula”, adapted by Steven Dietz from Bram Stoker’s novel, is directed by Matt Campbell and promises to restore “the suspense and seduction of Bram Stoker’s classic novel to the stage”.  Performances for this production are 7 p.m. nightly with Sunday’s performance at 2 p.m. 

The Highland Arts Theatre is making a speciality of Cape Breton playwright, Daniel McIvor’s works. His comedy, “The Best Brothers”, runs at the HAT from Tuesday, Nov. 19, to Sunday, Nov. 24. CONTRIBUTED
The Highland Arts Theatre is making a speciality of Cape Breton playwright, Daniel McIvor’s works. His comedy, “The Best Brothers”, runs at the HAT from Tuesday, Nov. 19, to Sunday, Nov. 24. CONTRIBUTED

That same week, the HAT presents Daniel McIvor’s play, “The Best Brothers”, a profound and hilarious comedy” about a family coping with the sudden death of their mother. McIvor is a globally acclaimed playwright best known locally for “Marion Bridge” and “Communion”. Performances for this production are 8 p.m. nightly. 

The HAT also closes out the season with the return of its perennial favourite musical adaptation of Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”. This joyous, tune-filled, high-stepping production about a miser and the ghostly visitors who help mend his mean ways has become a fixture of the holidays. Performances for “A Christmas Carol” run, at 8 p.m. nightly, from Tuesday, Dec. 10, to Sunday, Dec. 15. 

  

Ken Chisholm lives in Sydney and has written plays, songs, reviews, magazine articles. He can be reached at [email protected] 

https://www.capebretonpost.com/lifestyles/ken-chisholm-busy-diverse-autumn-theatre-season-begins-347038/

Milwaukee Fall Arts Guide 2019: September – Milwaukee Magazine

Milwaukee Fall Arts Guide 2019: September – Milwaukee Magazine

West Side Story, Doors Open Milwaukee and more this month in fall arts.

By Lindsey Anderson, Matt Hrodey, Adam Rogan and Hannah Hoffmeister

Can’t-Miss Events This Month

Fresh Coast Jazz Festival

The first-ever Fresh Coast Jazz Festival is bringing some of the biggest names in jazz and R&B to the city. The locally based multi-instrumentalist Chris Crain closes out the festival with a performance at Uihlein Hall this afternoon.

Sept. 1 at the Marcus Center


“Portrait of Milwaukee”

MAM curators scoured the museum’s collection – some works date back to the 1930s, others are from well-known contemporary artists – to put together this photographic exhibition. Collectively, the works tell the story of who and what made Milwaukee the city it is today.

Sept. 6-March 1 at the Milwaukee Art Museum

Milwaukee Art Museum

Photo courtesy of the Milwaukee Art Museum


Masur Takes the Reins

Since we learned last year that Ken-David Masur had been named the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra’s new director, we’ve been awaiting his first concert of the inaugural season. And here it is. Tonight he’ll be conducting pieces – like Schumann’s only piano concerto – that inspire him personally.

Sept. 13-15 at the Marcus Center


Hip-Hop DNA

Close to 30 musicians, including local favorites like Kiran Vee and WebsterX, are taking the stage tonight to pay tribute to hip-hop greats past and present. Expect a roster of songs as diverse as hip-hop itself, with many different decades and cultures represented.

Sept. 13 at the Marcus Center


 

West Side Story

The Rep set a new record this year, selling nearly 300,000 tickets for this iconic musical – which will also be receiving a Broadway revival next year – in a single day. Evidently the rest of Milwaukee loves dance-fighting and stories about star-crossed lovers as much as we do.

Sept. 17-Oct. 27 at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater

Photo courtesy of Todd Rosenberg


The Revolutionists

Milwaukee’s reigning drama queen, Laura Gordon, directs this delightfully anachronistic female-powered play. Set in France during the revolution of 1793, the comedy centers on the exploits of four women – an assassin, a playwright, a rebel and a former queen – as they attempt to restore peace to Paris.

Sept. 26-Oct. 20 at the Next Act Theatre


Vision Quest

In the mid-1980s, Tom Uttech was hunting for a new studio to replace the serviceable but constrained space he kept near UW-Milwaukee, where he was an art professor. He and his wife came across a barn in Saukville, with an extremely fat, friendly dog sitting outside – a detail he remembers vividly to this day.

Animals figure frequently in Uttech’s work, and the dog turned out to be a good omen – a sign that, with its high ceilings, open spaces and proximity to nature, the barn would provide the perfect setting for creating the massive, naturalistic works of art for which he is known.

Photo courtesy of the Museum of Wisconsin Art

Uttech is one of the state’s most successful landscape painters, though his scenes aren’t fully of this world: To varying degrees throughout his career, his lands (the basic seeds of which he began painting in grade school) have contained strange and otherworldly elements that stem from the essential oddness of Wisconsin. “There’s a thread of unreality here,” he says, “and I bit on it.”

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Uttech is an unusually scientific painter, interested in migratory species – like Audubon on a vision quest. A new exhibition on view at the Museum of Wisconsin Art from Sept. 28 to Jan. 12, “Tom Uttech: Into the Woods,” invites the public into the vision. His photography is also included in the form of original silver prints and digital photos, and the museum commissioned a new painting, “Nin Gassinsibingwe” (Ojibwe for “I Wipe My Tears”), for the show.

The retrospective allowed Uttech to rediscover his own work, including some finely painted, fantastical pieces he had stashed in unheated storage. At some point, he says, “You have to have a break from the fastidiousness.”

Matt Hrodey


What to See at Doors Open This Year

Doors Open Milwaukee is a a free, community-wide event that gives architecture buffs a chance to explore some of the city’s most beautiful buildings – is coming back to town Sept. 28-29. We asked architect Brian Hatzung, a principal with Zimmerman Architectural Studios who also serves on the board of directors for Historic Milwaukee Inc., for his must-hit list.

 Lindsey Anderson

Milwaukee City Hall is an iconic landmark with a beautiful interior atrium, well worth the visit.If you haven’t been to the Oriental Theatre, take the opportunity to check it out. A theater truly worthy of the movies!Northwestern Mutual Tower, top floor observation lounge. If for no other reason, spectacular views of the city. Great contemporary architecture, wonderful public spaces and a history of the company add value to the stop on your tour.Doors Open gives you the opportunity to see behind the granite facade of the U.S. Courthouse and Federal Building, which isn’t widely open to the public.The Zimmerman Architectural Studios and City Lights Brewing campus. It’s a slightly self-serving recommendation, but you won’t be disappointed! Enjoy a neck-bending view of an industrial cathedral like no other. While you’re there, visit 4 Seasons Skatepark and City Lights for a glimpse into more of the Milwaukee Gas Light Company operation.

Photos courtesy of: Visit Milwaukee; Randy Sherkenbach; U.S. General Services Administration

More to Explore

Third Ward Art Festival

The eighth-annual free festival kicks off September with 140 artists and counting – there’s a waiting list for artists, says Ruth Lawson, marketing and communications director of the Historic Third Ward Association. Broadway is blocked off and full of “great art, great artists.” Catalano Square, at the end of the Third Ward, will also be hosting its free “Ayre in the Square” outdoor concert on Aug. 31.

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FREE; Aug. 31-Sept. 1 in the Third Ward


“A Mouth-Shaped Room”

The exhibit, which opened at the end of June, is the creation of Toronto-born artist David Harper, who has been featured in museums in Canada, New York, Indiana and California. “Prone,” a large, intricate piece featured in the exhibit, lists 16 components and materials – among them ceramic, latex, hand-woven linen and a taxidermy bird.

Through Sept. 15 at the Villa Terrace Decorative Arts Museum


Titus Andronicus

Tickets to see Titus Andronicus – the band, not the Shakespearean play – are $15 in advance on X-Ray Arcade’s website. The set will hopefully include songs from the indie rock outfit’s sixth album, An Obelisk, which debuted this June. “This is not a return to the band’s roots – this is an excavation of the dirt beneath those roots which will leave no fingernail unsoiled,” the website proclaims.

Sept. 7 at X-Ray Arcade


Pundamonium: The Milwaukee Pun Slam

Pundamonium, created and hosted by Art Allen, reached Milwaukee in early 2014. To participate, just show up: 10 contestants are selected in first-come, first-serve fashion. Participants are given a slip of paper with a different topic (for example, “Facebook” or “bicycles”). They can brainstorm puns to match their topics until the first round starts.

Sept. 13 at Shank Hall


Maker Faire

Maker Faire Milwaukee is one of the largest maker faires in the world, says Carrie Wettstein, one of the event’s producers. With a goal of 250 exhibitors this year – all hands-on and interactive – the faire showcases everything from textiles to robotics. It’s a “great learning opportunity for young makers,” Wettstein says.

FREE; Sept. 14-15 at Wisconsin Center


Danceworks’ Movement Media Lab

After a 16-week process that started in June, the dancers and filmmakers of the Movement Media Lab will be presenting their finished products tonight. This is the program’s second year, says project manager Kym McDaniel. Dancers and filmmakers submitted proposals at the beginning of the program for film projects that feature dance or movement as a main theme. And they’ll be participating in a Q&A session after the show.

Sept. 28 at Danceworks’ Studio Theatre



“Fall Arts Guide” appears in the September 2019 issue of Milwaukee Magazine.

Find it on newsstands beginning September 2, or buy a copy online.

Be the first to get every new issue. Subscribe.

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https://www.milwaukeemag.com/milwaukee-fall-arts-guide-2019-september/

Happenings: Our September Calendar of Events – The Burg News

Museum & Art Spaces

AACA Museum
161 Museum Dr., Hershey
717-566-7100; aacamuseum.org

“Studebaker Cool: 114 Years of Innovation,” exploring South Bend, Indiana’s contribution to wheeled transportation,” through Oct. 20

“Harley-Davidson: History, Mythology and Perceptions of America’s Motorcycle,” through Oct. 20

“Raymond Loewy: A Retrospective,” an exhibit on the American industrial designer, who achieved fame for his design efforts, through Oct. 20

Art Association of Harrisburg
21 N. Front St., Harrisburg
717-236-1432; artassocofhbg.com

“Sustained: Artists and the Environment” Fall Membership show, Sept. 8-Oct. 10; reception: Sept. 8, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

Carlisle Arts Learning Center
38 W. Pomfret St., Carlisle
717-249-6973; carlislearts.org

“75th Anniversary Celebration: Yellow Breeches Chapter PA Guild of Craftsmen,” Sept. 6-21; reception: Sept. 6, 5-7 p.m.

“This Place I Call Home,” photography by Lori Snyder and pottery by Kurt Brantner, through Sept. 21

“People and Places, new works featuring candid observations of everyday scenes captured in plein air inspired style by Kim Stone and Pat Walach Keough, Sept. 27-Nov. 2; reception: Sept. 27, 6:30 p.m.

The Cornerstone Coffeehouse
2133 Market St., Camp Hill
717-737-5026; thecornerstonecoffeehouse.com

Artist of the Month: Kourtney Cannon

Fort Hunter
5300 N. Front St., Harrisburg
717-599-5751; forthunter.org

“Leisure Time Exhibit,” highlighting what the Reily family did for fun in their spare time as previous owners and residents of Fort Hunter, through December

Gallery on the Square
Millersburg Area Art Association
226 Union St., Millersburg
Facebook: Gallery on the Square

“Observations Absorbed by Patricia Marshall,” through Sept. 7

“Something for Everyone,” by Carrie Feidt, Sept. 11-Oct. 12; reception: Sept. 15, 3-5 p.m.

Hershey Area Art Association (HAAA)
hersheyareaartassociation.com

The Hershey Story Museum Exhibit, Sept. 5-8

Cocoa Beanery Art Exhibit, through Oct. 7

Hershey Public Library Exhibit, through Oct. 12

The Hershey Story Museum
63 W. Chocolate Ave., Hershey
717-534-8939; hersheystory.org

Hershey Area Story Museum Exhibit, Sept. 5-8


Messiah College School of Arts

One College Ave., Mechanicsburg
717-766-2511; messiah.edu

“Department of Art and Design Annual Juried Show 2018-2019,” through Sept. 6

“In Matter and in Mode” Faculty Exhibit, Sept. 13-Oct. 9

Metropolis Collective
17 W. Main St., Mechanicsburg
717-458-8245; metropoliscollective.com

“LIKENESS: A group show of Portraits,” Sept. 6-Oct. 24; reception: Sept. 6, 7-11 p.m.


The Millworks
340 Verbeke St., Harrisburg
717-695-4888; millworksharrisburg.com

New works by Caleb Smith, P.D. Murray, Tara Chickey, Joelle & Justin Arawjo, Ann Benton Yeager, Tina Berrier, through Sept. 15

Now works by Linda Benton McCloskey, Joelle and Justin Arawjo, Kristen Fava, John McNulty, John Davis and Mary Kandray Gelenser, Sept. 17-Oct. 13

National Civil War Museum
One Lincoln Circle, Harrisburg
717-260-1861; nationalcivilwarmuseum.org

“Boots and Saddles: Horses in the Civil War,” through June 7

Pennsylvania National Fire Museum
1820 N. 4th St., Harrisburg
717-232-8915; pnfm.org

Exhibits dedicated to Pennsylvania firefighting history

The Penny Gallery at The Pond
32 W. Pomfret St., Carlisle
717-245-0382; thepomfretgroup.com

“Out of the Dark,” an exhibition of artwork opening the paths to healing and hope in the struggle for suicide prevention, Sept. 6-25; reception: Sept. 6, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

“ArtsLive Series,” an art exhibition from of work by Red Tomato Farm participants, Sept. 27-Oct. 12; reception: Sept. 27, 6-8 p.m.

Perry County Council of the Arts
Landis House, 67 N. 4th St., Newport
717-567-7023; perrycountyarts.org

“Up Close,” a group exhibition of artwork in a variety of media that explores small worlds or highlights a portion of a larger whole, through Oct. 4

Perry County Council of the Arts
PCCA Gallery, 1 S. Second St., Newport
717-567-7023; perrycountyarts.org

“Felting Iki,” an exhibition of whimsical and cheerful felted art pieces by Crissy Miyake, who finds inspiration in the human relationship with and appreciation of nature, through Oct. 5


Rose Lehrman Art Gallery

One HACC Dr., Harrisburg
717-231-ROSE; hacc.edu/RLAC

Ceramics works by Carolanne Currier and Jack Troy, Sept. 3-Oct. 3; lecture: Sept. 5, 5:30 p.m.

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Cathedral and School
221 N. Front St., Harrisburg
717-236-4059

“Icons in Transformation,” Ludmila Pawlowska’s artistic interpretation of her experience of prayer and connection with eternity, through paintings and sculptures, Sept. 1 to Nov. 3

The State Museum of Pennsylvania­­­­
300 North St., Harrisburg
717-787-4980; statemuseumpa.org

“Art of the State,” the 52nd annual juried exhibition featuring Pennsylvania artists and craftspeople, through Sept. 8

“Pennsylvania at War: World War I Posters from the Pennsylvania State Archives,” through Dec. 29

“Pennsylvania at War: The Saga of the USS Pennsylvania,” through Dec. 29

Susquehanna Art Museum
1401 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg
717-233-8668; sqart.org

“Picasso: A Life in Print,” highlighting 1904-1970 works of Pablo Picasso from the collection of the John Szoke Gallery, through Sept. 22

“Artistic Expressions: Faculty Edition,” featuring the work of Harrisburg-area art teachers, through Oct. 20

“On Location: Harrisburg Sketchers,” featuring sketches from the past six years from a rotating cast of artists, through Oct. 27

“Hidden City,” the plein-air landscape paintings of Valeri Larko, through Nov. 17

Suzanne H. Arnold Art Gallery
Lebanon Valley College
101 College Ave., Annville
717-233-8668; lvc.edu/gallery

“A Theater of Things: The Work of G. Daniel Massad,” signature works spanning five decades, curated by Penn State’s Palmer Museum of Art, Sept. 4-Oct. 20

Wildwood Park
100 Wildwood Way, Harrisburg
717-221-0292; wildwoodlake.org

“Art In The Wild,” naturally inspired trailside creations along Wildwood Park’s wandering trails and wetlands, through Oct. 31

Winters Heritage House Museum
41-47 E. High St., Elizabethtown
717-367-4672; elizabethtownhistory.org

“Elizabethtown During the Great Depression,” through Sept. 20

Yellow Bird Café
1320 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg
717-635-8991; yellowbird-cafe.com

Works by Jennifer Rabenstein

Zeroday Brewing Co.
250 Reily St., Harrisburg
717-745-6218; zerodaybrewing.com

Art gallery by Darrienne Coffen, through Sept. 19

Art gallery by Stephen Zerbe, Sept. 20-Oct. 17

Read, Make, Learn

BrainVessel Gallery
4707 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg
717-350-2306; bvcargo.com

Sept. 11: Introduction to Watercolor I—Southern Magnolia, 6:30-9 p.m.
Sept. 21: Introduction to Watercolor II—An Apple a Day, 2-4:30 p.m.
Sept. 25: Introduction to Watercolor III—Birch Trees, 6:30-9 p.m.

Carlisle Arts Learning Center
38 W. Pomfret St., Carlisle
717-249-6973; carlislearts.org

Sept. 2-30: Understanding Abstraction, Mondays, 6-8 p.m.
Sept. 3-Oct. 8: Wheel 101, Tuesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Sept. 4-Oct. 9: Play with Clay at the End of the Day, Wednesdays, 3:45-5:15 p.m.
Sept. 7: Metal Etching, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28: STOP! Don’t Throw That Away—Upcycled, Sustainable Fashion, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 9-Oct. 14: Throw BIG!, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Sept. 13: Craft Beer & Clay, 7 p.m.
Sept. 24-Dec. 5: ArtWorks!, 3-5 p.m.
Sept. 25-Oct. 30: Fundamentals of Photography, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 25-Oct. 30: Fundamentals of Photography, 6:30-8 p.m.
Sept. 26-Nov. 7: Beyond Fundamentals of Photography, 6:30-8 p.m.
Sept. 28-Nov. 2: Intro to Cosplay Design, 12:30-2:30 p.m.

The Cornerstone Coffeehouse
2133 Market St., Camp Hill
717-737-5026; thecornerstonecoffeehouse.com

Sept. 11: Sicilian Specialties, 6-9 p.m.
Sept. 18: Weekend Gourmet, 6-9 p.m.
Sept. 25: “Tailgating” Wings & Beer Pairing, 6-9 p.m.

Detweiler Park
1451 Peters Mountain Rd., Dauphin
717-559-5188; dauphincounty.org

Sept. 24, 29: Forest Bathing, 9 a.m.-12 p.m.

East Shore Area Library
4501 Ethel St., Harrisburg
717-652-9380; dcls.org

Sept. 3, 17: Job Seeker Resources, 1-2:30 p.m.
Sept. 17, 24: Born to Read, 10:15-11 a.m., 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Sept. 17, 24: LEGO Robotics, 6-7 p.m.
Sept. 19: Device Club, 1-2:30 p.m.
Sept. 20: Social Security Basics, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 24: Annual Friends of East Shore Area Library Meeting, 1-3 p.m.
Sept. 27: Stop the Bleed, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 28: Camp Read S’more, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Elizabethtown Public Library
10 S. Market St., Elizabethtown
717-367-7467; etownpubliclibrary.org

Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24: Cards & Coffee, 9:15-10:30 a.m., 6:30-8 p.m.
Sept. 7: Family LEGO Club, 11 a.m.
Sept. 7, 21: Cards & Coffee, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 11: Teen Book Club, 7 p.m.
Sept. 11, 25: Anime Club, 6 p.m.
Sept. 12, 26: Community Knitters, 6 p.m.
Sept. 13: Second Friday, 5-8 p.m.
Sept. 14: Lace Cottage Tatting Workshop, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Sept. 21: Book Discussion Group, 9:15 a.m.
Sept. 21: Community Knitters, 11 a.m.

Fredricksen Library
100 N. 19th St., Camp Hill
717-761-3900; fredricksenlibrary.org

Sept. 3: Teen Homeschool Hangout, 10 a.m.
Sept. 3: Curl Up with the Classics—“The Turn of the Screw,” 10 a.m.
Sept. 3-30: Fall Story Times
Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25: Bilingual Story Time, 10:30 a.m.
Sept. 4 : Moving Forward Book Group with Hospice of Central PA, 1 p.m.
Sept. 5, 19: Blood Pressure Screenings with UPMC Pinnacle, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
Sept. 5, 19: The Plot Twisters (ages 15-18), 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 6: Youth Chess Night, 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 9, 16, 30: Tween Makerspace Drop-In (ages 9-13), 4-6 p.m.
Sept. 12: “Fake News, Fighting Words and ‘Fire—How Free is Free Speech?” w/ Mette Evans & Woodside, 7 p.m.
Sept. 13: Indie Film Friday, 2 and 7 p.m.
Sept. 13: Blood Dr. w/Central PA Blood Bank, 4-7:30 p.m.
Sept. 16: Twisted Stitchers, 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 19: READ to Dogs, 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 23: Fredricksen Reads—“Bridge of Clay,” 7 p.m.
Sept. 23: Foreign Film Friday—“35 Shots of Rum,” 2 and 7 p.m.

Gallery on the Square
Millersburg Area Art Association
226 Union St., Millersburg
Facebook: Gallery on the Square

Sept. 4, 11: Fiber and Friends, 6 p.m.
Sept. 19: Folk Art One Stroke, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.


Gretna Music
gretnamusic.org

Sept. 1: Jeremy Denk
Sept. 7: Telegraph Quartet w/Carl Ellenberger and Alex Shaw

Harrisburg Improv Theatre
1633 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg
717-798-6973; hbgimprov.com

Sept. 9-Oct. 28: Character Level 1, 7-10 p.m.
Sept. 10-Oct. 29: Intro to Improv, Tuesdays, 7-10 p.m.
Sept. 14: Vocal Harmony, 1-4 p.m.

Hershey Public Library
701 Cocoa Ave., Hershey
717-533-6555; hersheylibrary.org

Sept. 3, 5, 10, 12, 17, 19, 24, 26: Penn State Hershey—Mothers & Babies Together, 10 a.m.
Sept. 4: LEGO Club, 4 p.m.
Sept. 6, 20: Play Day for Families, 10 a.m.
Sept. 7, 21, 28: Chess Club, 1:30 p.m.
Sept. 8: Memoirs Class, 2 p.m.
Sept. 8: Friends Adult Program—Hospital Ship USNS COMFORT, 2 p.m.
Sept. 9: Hinduism in America, 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30: Books and Babies, 9:30 a.m.
Sept. 10, 11, 17, 18, 24, 25: 1, 2, Wheel!, 10 a.m.
Sept. 11, 18, 25: Sensory 1, 2, Whee!, 11 a.m.
Sept. 11, 18, 25: Tween Lounge, 3 p.m.
Sept. 12, 19, 26: Teen Lounge, 3 p.m.
Sept. 12, 26: Card Making Class, 6 p.m.
Sept. 14: Chess Tournament, 9 a.m.
Sept. 15: Friends Children Program—Poetry in Motion, 2 p.m.
Sept. 18: Adult Library Program—Nutrition for Kids, 7 p.m.
Sept. 22: Friends Adult Program—My Friendship with Fred Rogers, 2 p.m.
Sept. 23: Central PA Blood Dr., 3 p.m.
Sept. 29: Succulents Planting Class, 2:30 p.m.

The Hershey Story Museum
63 W. Chocolate Ave., Hershey
717-534-8939; hersheystory.org

Sept. 1-30: Chocolate Lab Classes, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26: Preschool Story Time, 9:15-10 a.m.
Sept. 13: “Celebration Truffles” Chocolate Lab Class, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Sept. 21: Museum Day, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Joseph T. Simpson Public Library
16 N. Walnut St, Mechanicsburg
717-766-0171; simpsonlibrary.org

Sept. 3: Tabletop Games, 6-8 p.m.
Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24: Tea & Stitches, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26: Mah Jongg, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Sept. 9: iPad/iPhone Beginners, 1-3 p.m.
Sept. 9, 23: English Conversation Club, 6:30-8 p.m.
Sept. 11: Mad About Mysteries, 7-8 p.m.
Sept. 16: Monday Morning Board Games, 10-11:30 a.m.
Sept. 16: Monday Night Book Club, 7-8 p.m.
Sept. 18: SciFi Book Club, 7-9 p.m.
Sept. 19: Thursday Morning Book Club, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Sept. 24: Tea & Stitches, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Sept. 25 : Apple Users Group, 1-3 p.m.
Sept. 25: Yoga for Seniors & Beginners, 7-8 p.m.

Kline Library
530 S. 29th St., Harrisburg
717-234-3934; dcls.org

Sept. 12: Social Security Basics, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Sept. 18: Knit 1, Crochet Too!, 6-8 p.m.
Sept. 19, 26: Storytime Yoga, 10:15-11 a.m.
Sept. 19: Friends of Kline Library Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Sept. 20, 27: Born to Read, 10:15-11 a.m.
Sept. 25: Paperback Pumpkin, 6-7:30 p.m.

The LGBT Center of Central PA
1306 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg
717-920-9534; centralpalgbtcenter.org

Sept. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29: Common Rd.s Young Adult, 4-6 p.m.
Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25: Common Rd.s Youth, 6-8 p.m.
Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28: Passageways—Trans and Non-Binary Group, 2-4 p.m.
Sept. 14: Queer & Trans People of Color Advisory, 6-8 p.m.

Madeline L. Olewine Memorial Library
2410 North 3rd St., Harrisburg
717-232-7286; dcls.org

Sept. 16, 23, 30: Born to Read, 10:15-11 a.m.
Sept. 16, 23, 30: Video Game Club, 4-5 p.m.
Sept. 17: Cooking with Essential Oils, 6-7:30 p.m.
Sept. 23: Cookbook Book Club—Potato Party, 6-7 p.m.

McCormick Riverfront Library
101 Walnut St., Harrisburg
717-234-4976; dcls.org

Sept. 4, 11, 18, 25: Mid-day Getaway, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Sept. 10, 12: Job Seeker Resources, 2-3:30 p.m.
Sept. 20: Dying for Love—A Library Mystery, 6-7:30 p.m.
Sept. 24: Device Club, 5:30-6:30 p.m.

Middletown Public Library
20 N. Catherine St., Middletown
717-944-6412; middletownpubliclib.org

Sept. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30: STEM Club, 5:30-7 p.m.
Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24: Storytime and Craft, 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24: Tales with T.A.I.L.S., 6-7 p.m.
Sept. 3, 17, 24: Family Yoga, 6-7 p.m.
Sept. 5: Book Club, 6-7 p.m.
Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26: LEGO Club, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Sept. 6, 13, 20, 27: Science Fiction Book Club (meets online)
Sept. 14: Library Scavenger Hunt, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 16: Mystery Book Club, 6-7 p.m.
Sept. 28: Teddy Bear Picnic, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Midtown Scholar Bookstore-Café
1302 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg
717-236-1680; midtownscholar.com

Sept. 5: An Evening with Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia, 6-8 p.m.
Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26: Almost Uptown Poetry Cartel, 7 p.m.
Sept. 6, 13, 27: Nathaniel Gadsden’s Spoken Word Café, 7 p.m.
Sept. 11: An Evening with Sean Carroll, 7 p.m.
Sept. 14: An Evening with James Poniewozik, 6 p.m.
Sept. 15: Midtown Writers Group, 1 p.m.
Sept. 15: LGBT Book Club, 4:30 p.m.

The Millworks
340 Verbeke St., Harrisburg
717-695-4888; millworksharrisburg.com

Sept. 10-Oct. 15: “If Walls Could talk” Mixed Media Class, 6-9 p.m.
Sept. 13-15: Advanced Cold Wax Techniques, 6-8:30 p.m.
Sept. 21: Fluid Art Class, 12-2:30 p.m.
Sept. 28: Advanced Fluid Art Class, 12-2:30 p.m.
Sept. 29: Kids Art Class, 12-1 p.m.

Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art
176 Water Company Rd., Millersburg
717-692-3699; nedsmithcenter.org

Sept. 5: The Fires of Penn’s Woods, 7-8 p.m.
Sept. 21: Hunter Trapper Safety, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

New Cumberland Public Library
1 Benjamin Plaza, New Cumberland
717-774-7820; newcumberlandlibrary.org

Sept. 5: Ruth’s Mystery Discussion Group, 10:15 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 5: Crochet Night, 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 10: Book Review Program—“Arrow Maker,” 10:30-11:30 a.m.
Sept. 11, 25: Wednesday Great Books Discussion group, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Sept. 14: Write-On Writer’s Workshop, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Sept. 16: Monday Great Books Discussion group, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Sept. 19: Adult Fall Craft, 6:30 p.m.
Sept. 21: Couponing For Extreme Savings, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 21: Children’s Book Writers Critique Group, 2-4 p.m.
Sept. 22: Pete Seeger’s 100th Birthday, 3-4 p.m.
Sept. 25: PennWriters Writing Group, 6-9 p.m.

Perry County Council of the Arts
Landis House, 67 N. 4th St., Newport
717-567-7023; perrycountyarts.org

Sept. 7: Drop-In Art, 1-4 p.m.
Sept. 11-Oct. 16: Arts for All inclusive art classes with The Arc of Cumberland & Perry Counties, Wednesdays, 10-11 a.m. and 1-2 p.m.
Sept. 14: Bucknell University’s Small Business Development Center The First Step—Pre-Business Workshop for Artists, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 24-Oct. 29: Watercolors for Adults—Landscape Building Blocks, 9:30-11:30 a.m.
Sept. 24-Oct. 29: Watercolors for Adults—Beginner Fundamentals, 6-8 p.m.

Rockhill Trolley Museum
430 Meadow St., Rockhill Furnace
814-447-9576; rockhilltrolley.org

Sept. 7-8: Grandparents’ Day Weekend

The State Museum of Pennsylvania
300 North St., Harrisburg
717-787-4980; statemuseumpa.org

Sept. 6: StoryTime—“Because of an Acorn,” 10:30 a.m.
Sept. 8: Artist Conversations, 2 p.m.
Sept. 12: Curiosity Kids—Tinkering Minds, 11:30 a.m.
Sept. 20: Archaeology at Fort Hunter, 4-6 p.m.
Sept. 26: Nature Lab—Ruffed Grouse and Wild Turkey, 11:30 a.m.

Susquehanna Art Museum
1401 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg
717-233-8668; sqart.org

Sept. 18: Life Drawing Class, 6-9 p.m.

Untitled: A Storytelling Project
untitledhbg.com

Sept. 22: Storytelling Workshop, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (at State Museum)
Sept. 29: Untitled at the Cinema—Life through Another Lens, 7 p.m. (at Midtown Cinema)

Wildwood Park
100 Wildwood Way, Harrisburg
717-221-0292; wildwoodlake.org

Sept. 1: Sunday Evening Bird Walk, 6-8 p.m.
Sept. 8: Gallery Walk, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
Sept. 11: Stress Relief Walk, 5:45-7:15 p.m.
Sept. 14: Volunteer Work Day, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Sept. 15: Flower Walk—Goldenrods, Asters, and Other Fall Surprises, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Sept. 19: Get in Shape Walk, 5:45-7:15 p.m.
Sept. 21: Brownies—Bugs & Hiker, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

William H. & Marion C. Alexander Family Library
200 W. Second St., Hummelstown
717-566-0949; dcls.org

Sept. 3: Novel Thoughts Book Club, 6:30-8 p.m.
Sept. 5: Teen Night—Worst Case Scenario, 6-7 p.m.
Sept. 11: 2nd Wednesday Cinema, 6-8 p.m.
Sept. 17: Novel Thoughts Too Book Club, 1-3 p.m.
Sept. 18, 25: Born to Read, 10:15-11 a.m., 11:30-12:15 p.m.
Sept. 23: Paperback Pumpkin, 1-2:30 p.m.
Sept. 25: Social Security Basics, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

Yoga at Simply Well
28 S. Pitt St., Carlisle
717-968-0167; yogaatsimplywell.com

Sept. 4-25: Restore Your Core Level 1, Wednesdays, 2-3:30 p.m.
Sept. 7-Oct. 5: Beginner Yoga 5 Week Series, Saturdays, 2:30-4 p.m.
Sept. 9: Mindful Mondays, 11:15-11:45 a.m.
Sept. 21: Kids Night Out—Celebrate Fall, 6-8 p.m.

Live Music

American Music Theatre
2425 Lincoln Highway East, Lancaster
717-397-7700; amtshows.com

Sept. 5: The Piano Guys
Sept. 8: WITF Music—Storyteller Sessions
Sept. 13: The Springsteen Experience
Sept. 21: Leroy Van Dyke
Sept. 22: Three Dog Night w/Charlie Farren
Sept. 28: Fall Doo Wop Cavalcade

Appalachian Brewing Co./Abbey Bar
50 N. Cameron St., Harrisburg
717-221-1083; abcbrew.com

Sept. 5: Treehouse! and Quasi Kings
Sept. 6: Cripple But Free (Grateful Dead tribute)
Sept. 13: Flux Capacitor
Sept. 21: Driftwood
Sept. 26: Badfish—A Tribute to Sublime
Sept. 27: Scythian

Appell Center for the Performing Arts
50 N. George St., York
717-846-1111; appellcenter.org

Sept. 8: Dweezil Zappa
Sept. 11: Reckless Kelly
Sept. 14: Shemekia Copeland
Sept. 25: Darlingside

Boneshire Brew Works
7462 Derry St., Harrisburg
717-469-5007; boneshire.com

Sept. 3, 17: Open Mic
Sept. 12: Shawan and the Wonton

Carley’s Ristorante and Piano Bar
204 Locust St., Harrisburg
717-909-9191; carleysristorante.com

Sept. 3, 24: Mike Dempsey
Sept. 4, 11: Andrea Britton
Sept. 5, 10, 13, 17, 20, 26, 27: Noel Gevers
Sept. 6, 19, 22: Anthony Haubert
Sept. 7, 14: Ted Ansel
Sept. 12, 21, 28: Roy Lefevre
Sept. 18, 25: Chris Purcell

Carlisle Theatre
44 West High St., Carlisle
717-258-0666; carlisletheatre.org

Sept. 28: The Pettybreakers

Chameleon Club
223 N. Water St., Lancaster
717-299-9684; chameleonclub.net

Sept. 1: Social Distortion and Flogging Molly
Sept. 5: Eyehategod, 10 Years
Sept. 6: Samsara, Defiant
Sept. 7: Cold
Sept. 10: Lucy Dacus
Sept. 12: Sugar Candy Mountain
Sept. 14: Music for Paws and Claws
Sept. 18: Caludio Simonetti’s Goblin, The Toasters
Sept. 20: This Wild Life
Sept. 21: The Weeks
Sept. 22: VISTA
Sept. 25: God of Nothing
Sept. 26: C.W. Stoneking
Sept. 27: Saved By the 90’s
Sept. 28: If Not For More, Blessthefall and Escape the Fate, < PIG >


Cliff’s Tavern

1104 Carlisle Rd., Camp Hill
717-412-7323; cliffstavern.com

Sept. 6: Signal 21

Club XL
801 S. 10th St., Harrisburg
717-409-8975; xlhbg.com

Sept. 6: DJ Ecliptic
Sept. 7: Sugarhill Gang
Sept. 12: Supersuckers
Sept. 13: JS Ondara
Sept. 14: Cycles & Space Bacon w/Humandala
Sept. 20: Tyler Bryant and The Shakedown w/Coal & Volume To Nothing
Sept. 21: Trina
Sept. 26: Sebastian Bach w/Kobra & the Lotus
Sept. 27: The Struts
Sept. 28: Fever 333

The Cornerstone Coffeehouse
2133 Market St., Camp Hill
717-737-5026; thecornerstonecoffeehouse.com

Sept. 1: Samuel Sitler
Sept. 5: Kirk Wise
Sept. 6: Antonio Andrade
Sept. 7: Dominick Cicco
Sept. 8: Kevin Kline
Sept. 11: Open Mic w/Jonathan Frazier
Sept. 13: Joe Cooney
Sept. 14: Paul Zavinsky
Sept. 15: GRIT
Sept. 20: Michael Arthur
Sept. 21: Doug Morris
Sept. 22: David Fishel
Sept. 27: Janine Womack & Jody Echterling
Sept. 28: Hard Travelin
Sept. 29: Colette Eckert

Fredricksen Library
100 N. 19th St., Camp Hill
717-761-3900; fredricksenlibrary.org

Sept. 15: Springsteen tribute concert

Gretna Music
gretnamusic.org

Sept. 1: Jeremy Denk
Sept. 7: Telegraph Quartet w/Carl Ellenberger and Alex Shaw

Hollywood Casino
777 Hollywood Blvd., Grantville
717-469-2211; hollywoodprnc.com

Sept. 1: Radio Neon
Sept. 6: Colt Wilbur Band
Sept. 7: DJ Magic, Josh Squared Band
Sept. 13: Sapphire
Sept. 14: DJ Ray Rossi, Kashmir, Honeypump
Sept. 20: Smooth Like Clyde
Sept. 21: DJ Koolie Kirk, The Luv Gods
Sept. 27: Uptown Band
Sept. 28: DJ Matrix, Jumper

Keystone Capital Chorus
717-350-5712; kccsing.com

Sept. 28: “Disney Through the Ages”

Lebanon Valley College
101 College Ave., Annville
717-233-8668; lvc.edu/gallery

Sept. 24: Common Hour Jazz

The Lodge at Liberty Forge
3804 Lisburn Rd., Mechanicsburg
717-756-5032; lodgeatlibertyforge.com

Sept. 4: Open Mic w/Roy, Janelle & Frank
Sept. 5: North Mountain Ramblers
Sept. 12: Taylor Wire & Friends
Sept. 19: LeBlanc & Kissinger
Sept. 26: Shea & Len w/Devon Polulak

Luhrs Performing Arts Center
1871 Old Main Dr., Shippensburg
717-477-7469; luhrscenter.com

Sept. 18: REO Speedwagon
Sept. 20: Ronnie Milsap
Sept. 21: Alan Parsons
Sept. 22: Collective Soul

Majestic Theater
25 Carlisle St., Gettysburg
717-337-8200; gettysburgmajestic.org

Sept. 20: Wind Symphony and Orchestra

Market Cross Pub & Brewery
113 N. Hanover St., Carlisle
717-258-1234; marketcrosspub.com

Sept. 7: The Willys

Market Square Concerts
www.marketsquareconcerts.org

Sept. 20: Midori & Ieva Jokubaviciute

Messiah College School of Arts
One College Ave., Mechanicsburg
717-766-2511; messiah.edu

Sept. 14: Threefold Cord Women’s Choir
Sept. 15: Piano Times Two III
Sept. 20: Rod Gilfry
Sept. 27: Messiah College Wind Ensemble & Symphony

Metropolis Collective
17 W. Main St., Mechanicsburg
717-458-8245; metropoliscollective.com

Sept. 6: ALOW

The Mill in Hershey
810 Old West Chocolate Ave., Hershey
717-256-9965; themillinhershey.com

Sept. 7: Lucille
Sept. 14: No Band
Sept. 21: Ryan Mayersky
Sept. 28: Charlie McClanahan

New Cumberland Public Library
1 Benjamin Plaza, New Cumberland
717-774-7820; newcumberlandlibrary.org

Sept. 22: Pete Seeger’s 100th Birthday

River City Blues Club & Dart Room
819 S. Cameron St., Harrisburg
717-525-8926; rivercityhbg.com

Sept. 16: River City Big Band
Sept. 28: Don Johnson Project

Rose Lehrman Art Center
One HACC Dr., Harrisburg
717-231-ROSE; hacc.edu/RLAC

Sept. 26: The Capitol Steps

Rusty Rail Brewing Company
5 N. 8th North St., Mifflinburg
570-966-7878; rustyrailbrewing.com

Sept. 1: Willie Watson
Sept. 13: Vanessa Collier
Sept. 20: Driftwood

Stock’s on 2nd
211 N. 2nd Street, Harrisburg
717-233-6699; stocksonsecond.com

Sept. 6: Quentin Jones
Sept. 7: The North Side
Sept. 14: Ben Simcox
Sept. 20: Shea Quinn and Friends
Sept. 27: Drew Adams
Sept. 28: Ever Since Summer

The Susquehanna Folk Music Society
717-745-6577; sfmsfolk.org

Sept. 6: Bulgarika
Sept. 11: Rue de la Pompe w/Kevin Neidig
Sept. 20: Genticorum
Sept. 26: Old Blind Dogs

Whitaker Center
222 Market St., Harrisburg
717-214-ARTS; whitakercenter.org

Sept. 15: Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue

Zeroday Brewing Co.
250 Reily St., Harrisburg
717-745-6218; zerodaybrewing.com

Sept. 13: Josh Dominick
Sept. 20: Kevin Koa

The Stage Door

American Music Theatre
2425 Lincoln Highway East, Lancaster
717-397-7700; amtshows.com

Sept. 20: “Peppa Pig Live!”

Appell Center for the Performing Arts
50 N. George St., York
717-846-1111; appellcenter.org

Sept. 13: Brent Terhune

The Belmont Theatre
27 S. Belmont St., York
717-854-3894; thebelmont.org

Sept. 13-29: Disney’s “Frozen Jr.”

Dutch Apple Dinner Theatre
510 Centerville Rd., Lancaster
717-898-1900; DutchApple.com

Sept. 1-21: “Finding Neverland”
Sept. 14: Dave Attell
Sept. 26-Nov. 9: “The Will Rogers Follies”

 

Gamut Theatre Group
15 N. 4th St., Harrisburg
717-238-4111; gamuttheatre.org

Sept. 14-28: “Sleeping Beauty” (Popcorn Hat)

Harrisburg Comedy Zone
110 Limekiln Rd., New Cumberland
717-920-5653; harrisburgcomedyzone.com

Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26: Open Mic
Sept. 6, 7: Sid Davis and Gali Koup
Sept. 13, 14: Davin Rosenblatt and Pat House
Sept. 20, 21: Brad Lanning and Tim Loulies
Sept. 27, 28: Frank Del Pizzo and Kate Brindle

Harrisburg Improv Theatre
1633 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg
717-798-6973; hbgimprov.com

Sept. 20, 22: Intro to Improv Class Show
Sept. 21, 22: Musical Level 1 Class Show

Hershey Theatre
15 E. Caracas Ave., Hershey
717-534-3405; hersheytheatre.com

Sept. 10-15: Roald Dahl’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”
Sept. 21: Hershey Symphony—Cirque de la Symphonie
Sept. 26: “The Price is Right” Live

Little Theatre of Mechanicsburg
915 S. York St., Mechanicsburg
717-766-0535; ltmpa.com

Sept. 6-21: “Moon Over Buffalo”

Midtown Scholar Bookstore
1302 N. 3rd St., Harrisburg
717-236-1680; midtownscholar.com

Sept. 5: Almost U

Oyster Mill Playhouse
1001 Oyster Mill Rd., Camp Hill
717-737-6768; oystermill.com

Sept. 1: “Jeeves Takes a Bow”
Sept. 27-Oct. 31: “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof”

The Playhouse at Allenberry
1559 Boiling Springs Rd., Boiling Springs
717-258-3211; allenberry.com

Sept. 13-29: “Mamma Mia”

River City Blues Club & Dart Room
819 S. Cameron St., Harrisburg
717-525-8926; rivercityhbg.com

Sept. 29: “Risque Business”

Theatre Harrisburg
513 Hurlock St., Harrisburg
717-232-5501; theatreharrisburg.com

Sept. 6-22: “Noises Off” (at Whitaker Center)

Whitaker Center
222 Market St., Harrisburg
717-214-ARTS; whitakercenter.org

Sept. 6-22: “Noises Off” (Theatre Harrisburg)

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Happenings: Our September Calendar of Events

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